Larry & Coke
by: © John Byrne
8.9
Overall
Rating
8
General
impression
10
Subject
of photo
9
Composition
& Perspective
9
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
9
Depth
of field
7
Color &
Lighting
10
Focus
General
impression
John, you've got a nice photo of a genial looking gentleman. Good composition, good focus and depth of field.
8/10
Subject
of photo
There's a happy looking chap!
10/10
Composition
& perspective
Nicely composed, no unnecessary elements in the photo.
9/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
Clear, sharp, no camera movement, fairly well exposed (just a tad on the dark side).
9/10
Depth
of field
Good depth of field for f/2.8! Your subject is in focus, and even though his glass isn't quite as sharp, that does nothing to detract from your photo.
9/10
Color &
Lighting
I'm not a huge fan of direct flash. If your camera has a hot shoe or a PC socket, I'd strongly recommend getting an accessory flash and light modifier such as a Sto-Fen or a Gary Fong will help make your flash photos more natural looking. They will also help alleviate that ol' 'photo in a cave' look of a completely black background by illuminating some of the surrounding walls. The picture looks nice in black and white, but you're losing detail in the shadows where his shirt blends into the background.
7/10
Focus
Photo is sharp. Can't really do better than that!
10/10
Description
Tossing a large party, the host finally took a break. I just wanted to recognize his relight.
Technical Details

Olympus E-510

Lens: Standard: 30-50mm
Exposure time: 1/100 ,
F-stop: F2.8
ISO: 100
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Steve Hockstein
20+ Years
United States
People
13 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
Flash. It's not as easy as it seems. The trick to using flash is (for me at least) to get natural looking lighting. In my experience, the best way to do that is to NEVER use the flash that's built into the camera. If you can, an accessory flash unit, bounced off the ceiling or otherwise modified, will make a dramatic improvement with your flash photography. I use a Sto-Fen or Gary Fong modifier, usually aimed toward the ceiling.
2.
The black t-shirt is a problem, especially when dealing with the kind of lighting you've used. If your camera allows, always shoot in the RAW format. Using software like Adobe's Lightroom or probably even the software that came with your camera (or whatever you used to go to B&W), you can usually adjust the shadow detail so that there's separation between the shirt and the background, without effecting other regions of the photo. JPEG files don't always allow that kind of flexibility, and the results aren't usually as seamless as with RAW.
3.
One other thing to try: Use a slower shutter speed with flash (1/30, 1/15). That allows the ambient light to register and will bring some background detail out of the shadows. Experiment, play around, have fun!
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Steve Hockstein
Experience: 20+ Years
Still at the tender age of 14, Steve began his high school years shooting professionally for the Pennysaver/Community News in his home town of Parsippany, NJ. He continued shooting professionally for a variety of publications while studying Studio, Narrative and Documentary photography at the R...
Specialty:
People
Location:
United States
Jobs: 13 Jobs
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