Sunset Hues Flying High
by: © Donna Gabrielson
8.3
Overall
Rating
8
General
impression
8
Subject
of photo
6
Composition
& Perspective
9
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
10
Depth
of field
8
Color &
Lighting
9
Focus
General
impression
Good overall job Donna, the lighting, lens selection and depth of field is right on. Keep shooting those gulls and having fun.
8/10
Subject
of photo
The fact that gulls are pretty common doesn't change the fact that they are interesting subjects, for the same reason that people throw bread to them.
8/10
Composition
& perspective
The gull is a bit below the middle of the frame, and looking down. The image would be a bit better balanced if the gull were in the top half of the frame, as it would have more nose room (beak room?) to look into. The subject's eye line can carry quite a bit of visual weight. alternatively, you could frame it even a little bit lower in the frame to draw the viewer's attention to the fact that it's after something, but the risk there is that you would guide the viewer's eye out of the frame and therefore lead them to lose interest.
6/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
Well done. Both the sky and the gull are well exposed, and the depth of field is just enough to keep the bird itself sharp. She shutter speed is plenty fast enough to counter both subject and camera movement.
9/10
Depth
of field
Just right!
10/10
Color &
Lighting
Nice lighting, I like the way the light is falling on the gull and the colorful sky behind it.
8/10
Focus
The bird's eyes seem sharp, as does its outline. Well done, particularly since capturing birds in flight can be pretty challenging.
9/10
Description
Seagulls have always been my choice for photography at beaches. Sunset makes a beautiful background choice . They are truly amazing in their adaptation for which they fly.
Technical Details

Canon Rebel T2i

Lens: Telephoto: 50-200mm
Exposure time: 1/400 ,
F-stop: F5.6
ISO: 400
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Loren Fisher
20+ Years
United States
Nature
9 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
Shooting a flying bird is tough and you have to lead it with your camera rather than follow it. It is hard, but you have to anticipate where the bird is going so you can keep the bird where you want it in the frame.
2.
If there is something distracting in the background lower in the frame, you have to shoot the bird higher in the sky.
3.
In a perfect world, the "great" shots have at least three major "wow" elements, you have two: action and color. A third element could be having food in its beak or interacting with another bird. Obviously that isn't under your control but as you look at other photos, notice how the great ones go one step further. You have a good shot here, Donna, there are few photos that couldn't have something better! Keep up the good work.
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Loren Fisher
Experience: 20+ Years
A photographer since 1978, Loren has published two photography books: “Pope John Paul II: An American Celebration” which documented the papal visit to New York, New Jersey and Baltimore and “Branson Backstage” which looks at the phenomenon of 35 live music theaters in Branson, Missouri....
Specialty:
Nature
Location:
United States
Jobs: 9 Jobs
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