The long trip down a subway car
by: © Leonard Aschenbrand
9.7
Overall
Rating
10
General
impression
9
Subject
of photo
9
Composition
& Perspective
10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
10
Depth
of field
10
Color &
Lighting
10
Focus
General
impression
I like this type of image, recording only enough to tell it's location and rendering it to abstract. The lack of people in your image did give the impression of loneliness but I think adding a human, very minor in the image would give more interest yet still give the impression you were looking for.
10/10
Subject
of photo
This is a "realism abstract" subject and your subject is interesting because it is the lack of a subject surrounded by a concetric frames, and interesting concept. ;l
9/10
Composition
& perspective
I like how you chose to shift the subject off center so he image doesn't static and also like how the lines of lights lead the eye to the subject.
9/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
The image speaks obviously for itself that your choices were right on.
10/10
Depth
of field
The aperture you chose gave the deep depth of field as needed for your subject.
10/10
Color &
Lighting
The ambient light being warm causes the cool blue elements to stand out and contributes to the feeling you were looking for. I don't think that changing color balance would look natural because fo the shift tow cool that would be needed.
10/10
Focus
Your choice of small aperture gave the proper depth of field to the image continuing the repeating forms as if they are a pattern and not individual objects.
10/10
Description
The loneliness from seat to seat in an empty LIRR car attraced me to the shot.
Technical Details

Nikon D60

Lens: Zoom: Variable focal
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Ed Book
20+ Years
United States
Nature
7 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
in post capture editing, adding a very slight vignette to the edges not noticeable unless comparing before and after versions together will help guide the eye into the image. This is a common practice with my images and isn't noticed seeing only one version of the image.
2.
When finding a subject like this, I hope you are making many exposures with slight variations so y have a choice in the final image chosen. This type of photographing by serendipity, often will include elements that you didn't notice when the camera was at your eye. it's important to look at at the whole image before tripping the subject to eliminate any distracting elements.
3.
Also consider different cropping to see what other impressions you get when viewing. Try square and panorama shapes to give different impressions to the same image.
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Ed Book
Experience: 20+ Years
My interest in photography came from an inability for rote memorization–I could remember graphically instead. My early learning was as a naturalist and I used my photography as a way to share my world as I was seeing it. I shifted from 35mm/medium/large format film as digital capture develo...
Specialty:
Nature
Location:
United States
Jobs: 7 Jobs
Liked this photo review? share it with your friends: