My Little Hummingbird
by: © fallan
8.9
Overall
Rating
8
General
impression
10
Subject
of photo
8
Composition
& Perspective
9
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
10
Depth
of field
7
Color &
Lighting
10
Focus
General
impression
Fallan, you've captured a milestone moment in your young daughter's life. It's time to start thinking beyond the snapshot and creating a photograph that will capture a little more of the story without the harsh light of a straight, on-camera flash.
8/10
Subject
of photo
It's really great that you're documenting your daughter's childhood!
10/10
Composition
& perspective
Personally, I would have composed with your daughter's head a little more to the left, leaving the negative space to catch her gaze. I would have liked to see her eyes a little better too, getting a little more of an overhead angle, and maybe just a little more space around her.
8/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
Can't really find fault here either, but see my remarks under lighting.
9/10
Depth
of field
Everything that needs to be sharp is sharp.
10/10
Color &
Lighting
Okay, this is where I get mean! First off, I'm not a fan of on camera flash, especially those little built-in flashes. If that is indeed how you lit this, please... please! get yourself a tiltable hot-shoe unit and a light modifier such as those made by Gary Fong. Yeah, it's gonna cost you some bucks, but if you're serious about photography and having really nice photos of your daughter, it's a no-brainer. It will allow you to bounce the light off the ceiling or nearby wall with the effect of giving you a much more natural looking light. Never use harsh, straight flash if there is any way at all to avoid it.
7/10
Focus
Focus is spot on!
10/10
Description
Technical Details

Camera:

Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Steve Hockstein
20+ Years
United States
People
13 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
Think about your lighting. Try to use natural light, such as the beautiful light by a window, to capture your images. It's not always possible, but it will give you nicer, softer, more natural looking photos than that of an unmodified on-camera flash.
2.
Work on your composition. Capture all the elements you need to tell a story with your photo. Don't be afraid to try something unusual. Try to implement the Rule of Thirds with your composition - divide your photo into 3 grids of three, and never put your subject in the middle box.
3.
Take lots and lots of pictures. Try different things with lighting and composition. Do the unexpected. Have fun with your photos!
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Steve Hockstein
Experience: 20+ Years
Still at the tender age of 14, Steve began his high school years shooting professionally for the Pennysaver/Community News in his home town of Parsippany, NJ. He continued shooting professionally for a variety of publications while studying Studio, Narrative and Documentary photography at the R...
Specialty:
People
Location:
United States
Jobs: 13 Jobs
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