Transfixed - reworkedby: © Leonard Aschenbrand
8.9
Overall
Rating
9
Subject
of photo
10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
10
Focus
8
General
impression
8
Composition
& Perspective
7
Depth
of field
10
Color &
Lighting
Description
The exquisite architecture and the staute .....I know this is not Jesus on the Cross but it fooled me for starters........Reworked to bring the statue onto the rule of 1/3rds. Hope you like it
Technical Details

Nikon D60

Lens: Zoom: Variable focal
Exposure time: 1/200 ,
F-stop: F8
ISO: 1600
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Bart Teunis
10 Years
Netherlands
Nature
19 Jobs
Passion and emotion play an important role in my life and I try to show that in my photography as well. Being intro...
General
impression
Leonard, overall you've captured a nice image and it's great to see you experimenting with compositional elements. I think it would be stronger if captured symmetrically, with the perspective remaining the same - looking heavenward.
8/10
Subject
of photo
An interesting take on this type of subject.
9/10
Composition
& perspective
The lower perspective makes this shot more interesting than if it had been shot straight on looking just at the cross and not including the upper areas. Compositionally, I feel it may have been stronger as a symmetrical image, with Christ being centred and the the cross arms branching out left and right.
8/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
Good use of exposure to keep detail in the statues without losing detail in the darker areas.
10/10
Depth
of field
DOF is a little lacking in the foreground - you can see that the lower part of the door is not in focus.
7/10
Color &
Lighting
Colour balance is consistent and I actually like the diffused lighting - it doesn't restrict the details that are evident but perhaps slightly front 3/4 would have helped with texture and shape on Christ's robes.
10/10
Focus
Focus is good - detail is evident in both the doors and the other religious figures higher up on the cross.
10/10
How to improve your photo
1.
Experimenting with perspective, can often give you a much stronger image. Don't be afraid to really press the viewpoint - really low down looking upwards, or high up looking straight down.
2.
Try to shoot at different times of the day or spend a few hours photographing the subject. Watch as the light changes and how it effects the final image.
3.
For this type of shot DOF is very important. Hyperfocal distance will help you gauge your focus point to get the very best out of your selected aperture and DOF. http://www.dofmaster.com/hyperfocal.html
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Bart Teunis
Experience: 10 Years
Passion and emotion play an important role in my life and I try to show that in my photography as well. Being introduced to Photography and Dark room techniques at a young age by my father it took me over 20 years before I got hooked on photography again. I started a couple of years ago to tak...
Specialty:
Nature
Location:
Netherlands
Jobs: 19 Jobs
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