Morning Dew
by: © Debbie Zimmermann
8
Overall
Rating
8
General
impression
7
Subject
of photo
6
Composition
& Perspective
8
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
9
Depth
of field
10
Color &
Lighting
8
Focus
General
impression
Debbie. I like this shot. The light, soft colors and mood are great. The central static look is the only downside. Come back to this scene after a light rain or when there is dew dripping off the web and you have a winner!
8/10
Subject
of photo
Your subject name is a good one for the photo although dew is not very evident
7/10
Composition
& perspective
The composition has several dominant elements on either side, which distract from the primary subject which is likely the spider's web. The image is somewhat static due to centering on the web and no perspective view is used.
6/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
I don't have info on the lens used for this shot, but it might be very slightly blurred. Considering you used a tripod I would expect a tack sharp image. I wonder if a cable release or camera's timer was used since pressing the shutter even on a tripod can move the camera to cause minor shake. Also did you turn off the len's vibration reduction switch (which can also cause a slight blur when on a tripod). I still rated this feature an 8 since it is well done
8/10
Depth
of field
The narrow depth of field (arising from the low f stop of 5.6) used puts the background totally out of focus. Well done!
9/10
Color &
Lighting
The lighting in this shot is magical. Now if there was actual dew drops in the web it would be stunning.
10/10
Focus
The focus is well handled i this shot but see my comment details below
8/10
Description
Wanted to capture the early morning light reflecting on the morning dew
Technical Details

Nikon D90

Lens: Zoom: Variable focal
Exposure time: 1/100 ,
F-stop: F5.6
ISO: 400
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
David Smith
20+ Years
Canada
Travel
1 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
Change perspective. Change your camera's angle to the side, zoom in and spot focus on a portion of the web to create a dynamic image angle and the higher focal length will put the side elements totally out of focus. You can also crop out the side elements in the current shot to reduce their influence on the web.
2.
Move the camera up so that the fence post, web and gate are in the lower portion of the scene and the blurred out background is about 2/3 of the upper portion. This "minimalist" view might be very dramatic non static image
3.
Concentrate on better tack sharpness. Use a better quality lens, cable release, turn off vibration reduction or any combination. You want to make the foreground/spider's web jump out at you.
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David Smith
Experience: 20+ Years
David Smith is a professional photographer, travel writer and lecturer based in Vancouver, BC and is published worldwide. Get half off his online travel photo https://www.udemy.com/travel-photography-amazing-tips-and-techniques/?couponCode=GURU Visit his Interface Images world gallery: www.int...
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