Having squab for dinner
by: © Leonard Aschenbrand
9.7
Overall
Rating
10
General
impression
10
Subject
of photo
9
Composition
& Perspective
10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
10
Depth
of field
9
Color &
Lighting
10
Focus
General
impression
A great study of the bird of prey family. You captured it's beauty and nature perfectly, Leonard - I hope you managed to get several images as she fed!
10/10
Subject
of photo
I love birds of prey and this is a wonderful image that shows their beauty and nature all in one.
10/10
Composition
& perspective
The composition is really nice - perhaps a slight adjustment down and to the left would be help slightly. By including the lower part of the branch and cropping from the RHS, the rule of 3rds would be stronger. I would have touched out the small branch on the RHS and in the front of the branch also - a little distracting.
9/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
Great exposure Leonard! Some lovely detail in the highlights in the feathers behind his legs.
10/10
Depth
of field
Well chosen DOF - the hawk stands out beautifully from the background.
10/10
Color &
Lighting
The diffused lighting works well with this subject. If the sun had been stronger, and the conditions able to be more controlled, slight side lighting would have helped to bring out th etexture of the feathers and tree bark better. As it stands, under the offered conditions, the lighting works well.
9/10
Focus
Great focus - tree branch, prey and hawk are all nicely focussed.
10/10
Description
Basically it was the brutality but beauty of nature in action. This red tail hawk was being photographed by 6 different photogs while enjoying a fresh kill.
Technical Details

Nikon D60

Lens: Super-Telephoto: > 2
Exposure time: 1/400 ,
F-stop: F8
ISO: 1600
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Rakesh Malik
9 Years
United States
Nature
34 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
With subjects like this, often time is of the essence. Try to compose and shoot as many angles as you can to ensure you capture the one that really does the subject justice.
2.
Once you have the ideal composition, make slight changes to adjust for those things you think may improve the image even further.
3.
Try to shoot as many different viewpoints as possible - wide, close, macro - makes for interesting studies and combining them for a triptych would be great.
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Rakesh Malik
Experience: 9 Years
I am one of those oddball photographers who actually uses natural light for nearly all of my photography. I am also in a small minority for the fact that I don't go hiking without my large format camera; it's one of those old time box cameras like you've seen in pre-World War II films. Sure, I ...
Specialty:
Nature
Location:
United States
Jobs: 34 Jobs
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