Hey, I am big but harmful.
by: © Debbie O
8.4
Overall
Rating
7
General
impression
9
Subject
of photo
7
Composition
& Perspective
9
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
9
Depth
of field
8
Color &
Lighting
10
Focus
General
impression
It is a very nice photo with a lot of potential. Just a few small problems prevent it from being a great picture.
7/10
Subject
of photo
I've always been fascinated by this prehistoric relics and I think they're the closest thing to a Wolly Mammoth that we have left!
9/10
Composition
& perspective
While the perspective is excellent (as we are right down at the animal's eye level), the composition leaves a bit to be desired as the subject's head is dead centre and the rear end of the Musk Ox is clipped off, just slightly.
7/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
This looks to be very well done. Photographing a dark animal against snow on a bright sunny day is very challenging. While the highlights on the snow look a bit blown out that is acceptable because the important part of the exposure is the animal and that exposure looks great. Today's digital cameras just don't have enough dynamic range to capture all the tones between those bright whites on the sunny snow and the dark fur and the animal.
9/10
Depth
of field
Depth-of-field looks fine. With an animal like this it is important that the eyes are sharp while the background is less important and you did a good job here.
9/10
Color &
Lighting
I'd say you did a great job with the lighting and the color. Could you have gotten around the animal so you had the sun working with you rather than against you? One trick is to "try" to point your shadow towards the animal you're photographing to help you remember where to position yourself relative to the sun.
8/10
Focus
Great job.
10/10
Description
A muskot while skidooing in the tundra. He/she was soaking up the sun I got very close and took a took a few pics. Such a beautiful animal, did not want to scare him  see all >
A muskot while skidooing in the tundra. He/she was soaking up the sun I got very close and took a took a few pics. Such a beautiful animal, did not want to scare him because they need their energy to go through such cold an long winters.
Technical Details

Canon Digital Rebel XSi

Lens: Telephoto: 50-200mm
F-stop: F5.6
ISO: 200
Flash: None
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Paul Burwell
20+ Years
Canada
Nature
67 Jobs
How to improve your photo
1.
If you are going to "amputate" part of an animal's body (or person for that matter) you want to make it look like it was intentional instead of an accident.
2.
Photographs rarely work best when the main area of attention on a subject is directly in the center of the frame. In a photo like this, I'd suggest the head and eyes be placed on one of those magic rule of thirds points to make a stronger image. If you are unfamiliar with the rule of thirds, just Google it and you'll find a ton of information.
3.
Photographs of animals that have their eyes on direct opposite sides of their heads are often stronger with their head turned in profile instead of directly towards the camera. Maybe if you waited a few moments, the animal would have turned its head (still slightly towards the camera) for a stronger shot. It's through the eyes of critters, people, pets, etc. that viewers of images connect with the images. For that reason, it is often helpful for the viewer to have an unobstructed view of at least one eye.
Get your photos reviewed by this GuruShots Pro
Paul Burwell
Experience: 20+ Years
I am a contributing editor and regular columnist with Outdoor Photography Canada Magazine and I own a photography school called the Burwell School of Photography where we conduct over 20 different courses and photography workshops per year. I've built a career in the world of nature photography...
Specialty:
Nature, Animal, Wildlife, Documentary, Panoramic
Location:
Canada
Jobs: 67 Jobs
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